A common narrative among the world’s most prized companies is their early development as startups. In the past, creating a large and successful enterprise was seen as a major undertaking.

Today's new businesses launch in small industrial spaces, spare bedrooms, even in garages. Globally, small businesses make up a significant portion of the vast, global economy. In the U.S. alone, businesses of 500 employees or less comprise nearly half of the economy.

Despite these small beginnings, many startup owners are seeking exponential growth of their business, often with a single-minded vision of being acquired by a larger company.

In his number one Wall Street Journal bestselling book, Gary Keller extolls a concept called "The ONE Thing." In it, he poses the question:

“What’s the ONE Thing you can do such that by doing it everything else will be easier or unnecessary?”

At Equa, our laser-focused intent and “one thing” is to help mitigate the friction associated with new business formation, management, and ownership. We seek to help businesses begin on a solid foundation, one that allows them to accelerate their market entry while eliminating costs.

Large, well-funded companies often have a wealth of resources to fuel their strategic growth, thereby gaining a decided advantage in the marketplace. Equa hopes to bring balance to this startup playing field by delivering a cost-effective, streamlined destination for business management activities such as documents, banking, and compliance.

The Equa platform allows members to form a new business entity, obtain a bank account, and secure a tax ID within minutes. All of this significantly reduces the amount of time and money associated with forming and managing a business.

The Building Blocks

Equa's Founder and CEO, Shawn Owen, says the company’s primary focus is to deliver a quality user experience to those starting a business or entrepreneurial venture. In other words, how to bring efficiency to the end user whether it’s an owner, business manager, investor — anyone who is the part of an organization.

Comments Owen: “Anytime you can make something more efficient and save people time and money, they love it."

But the bigger picture, he says, is the notion of a central source of truth. In other words, once you have everyone’s information in one place, why not evolve it into all the other forms of agreements that people make.

“There is always a series or sequence of agreements tied to business transactions. Keeping these in one place allows you to free up time for your “One Thing” which is to deliver a great product.”

Owen also underscores the theme of simplicity for business owners:

“When you get too technical people get scared. By way of example, think about something as simple as Bitcoin. When you talk about what Bitcoin is in a simple way, people are like, ‘I get it. It’s digital gold or whatever.’ But when you get too deep into the details, it can actually be very complicated. So. at the end of the day, we want to avoid confusing people and keep their lives simple.”

Continues Owen: “One of the things I have always wanted to see and I think most people who are technology advocates also want to see is a user interface and experience that’s easy enough for even a grandmother to use. In other words, they are intuitively able to use it without having to know too much.”

He concludes: “Our goal is to make the user experience our number one focus so a person would never have to know anything about the underlying technology. As long as someone gets just the basics, they’ll be able to use it.”

To learn more about Equa and sign up for a free trial, please visit us at www.equa.global

Corporate bylaws are a vital element of a newly formed company, providing key rules and regulations for operational effectiveness. They aredrawn up and codified by the board of directors when a corporation is being formed. This document helps to ensure that a business runs consistently from its inception.

Bylaws thus become the critical document to aid the board of directors in their oversight of the corporation.

Terms included in a corporate bylaw are dictated by the guidelines set by a particular state. These typically include important information such as the following:

In most states, limited liability companies (LLCs) are required to create an LLC operating agreement. These operating agreements, essentially function as a set of corporate bylaws, offering guidelines for how an LLC operates as well as owner responsibilities. The documents are often key for responding to legal issues and are legally binding.

Typically LLC’s and corporations are not required to file bylaws and operating agreement documents with the Secretary of State office. They may, however, be requested by lenders, banks, attorneys, and potential investors for various business activities.

To learn more about Equa and sign up for a free trial, please visit us at www.equa.global